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The School of Rock The School of Rock

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The School of Rock

ages 11+ | 73 % Say It's Worth Your Time
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Overly enthusiastic guitarist Dewey Finn (Jack Black) gets thrown out of his bar band and finds himself in desperate need of work. Posing as a substitute music teacher at an elite private elementary school, he exposes his students to the hard rock gods he idolizes and emulates -- much to the consternation of the uptight principal (Joan Cusack). As he gets his privileged and precocious charges in touch with their inner rock 'n' roll animals, he imagines redemption at a local Battle of the Bands.



Release Date:

Runtime:

Genre: Comedy

Writer: Mike White

Director: Richard Linklater

Producer: Scott Rudin, Scott Aversano, Steve Nicolaides

Cast: Joan Cusack, Jack Black, Angelo Massagli, Sarah Silverman, Mike White, Jordan-Claire Green, Veronica Afflerbach, Miranda Cosgrove, Robert Tsai, Kevin Clark, Maryam Hassan, Caitlin Hale, Cole Hawkins, Brian Falduto, James Hosey, Aleisha Allen, Zachary Infante, Rebecca Brown, Joey Gaydos Jr.

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Ok for ages 11+ . What would you rate it?

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Rated PG-13 Some Rude Humor|Some Drug References

  • 3 of 10 Sex & Nudity
  • 3 of 10 Violence & Gore
  • 3 of 10 Profanity

Content details via Kids-In-Mind

Worth Your Time?

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 73%
say worth your time 11 Votes

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  • (Male)

    ages 8+ | Worth Your Time

    This is a very charismatic collision of Rock n' Roll meets childhood innocence, with a hilarious outcome. This is as good as I have seen Jack Black, supported by some good comedic performances from children. It may be that I relate to this movie more easily than most because I have lived in world with the kids/rock dichotomy, but you don't need to love rock music to enjoy this one. You do, however, need to appreciate Jack Black's energetic brand of humor, which he keeps relatively tame throughout this one.

     2 Thanks ·
  • No Maturity Rating | Worth Your Time

    Parents need to know that School of Rock is as much a vehicle for Jack Black to make rock 'n' roll faces while playing guitar as it is hilarious fun for musicians and music fans of all ages -- even younger than the PG-13 rating would suggest. There is occasional profanity -- some of it spoken by 10-year-olds -- and Black's character freely discusses his hangovers with the class he's teaching. There are brief shots of adult characters drinking and smoking (this is about playing rock 'n' roll, after all), but nothing terribly gratuitous. Beyond this, School of Rock is an enjoyable way for kids to learn about music, and for families to talk about the amount of work and personal satisfaction that results in starting a band. Furthermore, the film addresses body issues in a positive way when one of the girls in class is afraid to sing because she thinks she's "too fat."

  • (Male)

    ages 9+ | Worth Your Time

    This is one of Jack Black's more tame films but we still get to see his personality and love for music. He did a great job in this one.

    Parents and their kids alike should enjoy this one. It's not for young children but could go well with a pre-teen crowd.

  • (Male) Deseret News Critic

    No Maturity Rating | Worth Your Time

    "The School of Rock" is sort of a mess. But it could have been — and probably should have been — a much bigger mess.
    Among other things, this music-based comedy borrows from such diverse cinematic sources as "Dead Poet's Society," "Fame," "The Bad News Bears" and "Catch Me If You Can." And star Jack Black, a comedian who usually makes the movies he appears in entertaining but has the bad habit of hijacking some of them . . . to their detriment. (The major exception being "High Fidelity.")
    Yet, for some reason, it works. Hilariously.
    "The School of Rock" is also one of the sweetest, most appealing comedies to come along in quite some time, and much of that can be attributed to Black, who reveals a considerably more tender side here. (This is also one of the cleanest PG-13 rated films in recent memory, aside from a few tame profanities and some drug imagery.)
    Black stars as Dewey Finn, a failed rock musician who needs a job. He's just been thrown out of his band, and he's in danger of being kicked out of his apartment unless he gets some fast cash.
    So he decides to impersonate his roommate, Ned (Mike White, who also wrote the film), a substitute teacher. Dewey accepts a position at Horace Green, a first-rate prep school run by rigid principal Rosalie Mullins (Joan Cusack).
    True, Dewey has no experience, but he figures he can simply "baby-sit" the kids and slack off for a few weeks, while collecting a paycheck. But then something unexpected happens; he discovers his students are musical prodigies and may be able to provide the perfect back-up band for the rock group of his dreams and win an upcoming Battle of the Bands.
    Director Richard Linklater selected the youngsters here for their musical, rather than acting, abilities. And as amazing as they are (especially Joey Gaydos Jr.'s guitar-shredding skills), their most impressive talent may be keeping a straight face when Black cuts loose with goofy facial and body contortions.
    Obviously, this is Black's show. And longtime fans won't be disappointed. He's just as wild as ever. However, there's a real vulnerability to his performance that hasn't really been onscreen before.
    Cusack again impresses in what's a rather underwritten role. (The scenes in which her character finally cuts loose are among the film's best.)
    "The School of Rock" is rated PG-13 for a handful of profanities, some mildly vulgar humor (references), drug references and some slapstick violence (stage diving). Running time: 108 minutes.
    E-MAIL: jeff@desnews.com


Okfor ages12+